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Learning about the “Englishes” at Rangsit University International College (RIC)

By Asst. Prof. Gessanee Maneerutt

 

My name is Asst. Prof. Gessanee Maneerutt, my family calls me Gessy. I am an English teacher at the Department of General Education, Rangsit University International College (RIC). 

By Asst. Prof. Gessanee Maneerutt

 

My name is Asst. Prof. Gessanee Maneerutt, my family calls me Gessy. I am an English teacher at the Department of General Education, Rangsit University International College (RIC). 

My main duty is to teach English and leadership courses to first year and second year students who come from different parts of the world.

 

 

I have been working happily in this organization for more than 20 years and I love my job as a teacher and I love my students. I have been voted as an outstanding teacher for many years by my students, year after year, and I feel very thankful to them. This inspires me to teach them as best as I can. And I would like to tell you what we are doing at RIC.

 

 

How Many People in The World Speak English?

 

With reference to a research done sometime during the year 2016 to 2019, out of the approximately 7.8 billion inhabitants of the world, there are less than 2 billion people who speaks English. 

 

And from these 2 billion English speakers, only about 500 million speaks English as their first language (Americans, English, Australians, New Zealanders, etc.). The majority aren’t native English speakers at all.

 

So, what does it mean? It means that there are 1,500 million non-native English speakers out there and that includes you and me. 

 

My dear readers, what I want to clarify here is there are at least 3 times more non-native English speakers than native English speakers. 

 

Englishes

 

The English language spoken among non-native English speakers is called “Englishes” (meaning different styles of English speaking).  

 

Therefore, the styles of English of each non-native English-speaking country (e.g., the Philippines, Singapore, Malaysia, India, Indonesia, Thailand, etc.) are different from country to country, and from culture to culture. 

 

As such, the English-speaking style is reflected in each country’s way of communication. Therefore, talking about perfect English is out of the question. 

 

It is because the main reason that people speak English is to get their messages across with the intention of making others understand what they are talking about. And this is the ultimate reason why we learn English language in schools.

 

At
RIC, we teach our international students to communicate successfully with their friends who are from different countries, cultures and beliefs. Therefore, the diversity in languages, culture and beliefs are not barriers among international students to mingle and work together.

 

Students are taught to broaden their mind, adjust themselves, and speak up their ideas in English under the cross-cultural scenarios. Included with English language learning in class, students also participate in extra-curricular activities outside of the classroom like International Day, Chinese New Year, Songkran Festival, Halloween, Thanksgiving Day, etc. 

 

 

For
example, during the International Day, international students are given a
certain amount of budget to help showcase their national identity through the
wearing of their national costumes, traditional dances, national songs, and
serving their national food to the international community.

 

We
strongly believe that through experiencing the different languages and culture,
students will learn to appreciate more and respect other people. So, our students
can learn English from both inside and outside of the classroom.

 

At
the end of my message, I would like to encourage those who are interested in
attending an international program, please come to see us for more information,
contact RIC, or email me at
gessanee.m@rsu.ac.th.